Blog Postings

June 3,2013

11:20
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo presented the 2013-2014 budget on October 29, 2012. During the governor’s state-of-the-state address on January 9, 2013, he highlighted several major accomplishments, including:
·        Eliminating the budget gap (in January 2011 it was projected to be $17.4 billion by 2013-14)
·         State operations spending is held to 2 percent growth year over year
·        Establishing the following reforms:
o    A property tax cap
o    A new pension system (Tier VI)
o    Lowest middle-class tax rate in 58 years
 
The state budget experienced an increase of 8 percent from 2013. Over the past two years, Governor Cuomo has worked to rebuild the state and establish a comeback. His strategies this year focus on economic growth, creating a world-class education system, and fiscal integrity for New York to become “the progressive capital of the nation once again.”
 
The state’s IT budget increased by 16 percent, and the general government vertical saw the biggest increase (48 percent), mainly due to large IT projects released by the Office for Technology. Specific projects include statewide public safety communications, the state’s data center, and an IT initiative program.
 
The health care and higher education verticals saw a 2 percent and 3 percent increase, respectively. Additionally, several verticals saw a decrease in IT spending, including economic development/regulation (98 percent), natural resources/environment, and justice/public safety (both at 18 percent). These decreases are attributed to projects previously funded in FY 2013 being either completely removed or having their budgets decreased dramatically. As a result, more funding is given to other verticals, specifically general government.
 
Analyst’s Take
 
Governor Cuomo’s vision can be summed up in his following statement: “New York state is rising to build a smarter, stronger state than we’ve ever had before.”
 
He has emphasized investing in technology to create new business and improve New York’s economy, and projects such as “innovation hot spots” will connect “higher education institutions to encourage private-sector growth.” The increase of funds for large projects across the education and economic verticals will also help bolster economic growth and will be a good opportunity for vendors to consider investing in.
 
Cuomo has an ambitious agenda to improve a range of initiatives, from education to gun control to women’s rights. It is clear that, based on the success of the past two years and the improving economy, the governor feels confident that more jobs will be created, education will be reformed, and other initiatives will prosper.
 
For an extended version of this article, please go here
 
For more information on New York’s FY 2013-2014 budget, visit the state profile here.
 
GovWin IQ subscribers can read further about these projects in the provided links. Non-subscribers can gain access with a GovWin IQ free trial

 

Source: B2G Blog
Categories: All , Technical
11:00

This is the story of how four local government employees, on our own time, formed a team and participated in the National Day of Civic Hacking; what we accomplished and what we learned.

I recently participated in the National Day of Civic Hacking by attending the Boulder Civic Hackfest in…

Categories: All , Technical
11:00

This is the story of how four local government employees, on our own time, formed a team and participated in the National Day of Civic Hacking; what we accomplished and what we learned.

I recently participated in the National Day of Civic Hacking by attending the Boulder Civic Hackfest in…

Categories: All , Technical
10:51

The Sunlight Foundation is compiling a list of "transparency advocates" (CSOs, groups, networks, government projects) from all around the world. They are making their findings public as a spreadsheet available as a google doc ( https://docs.google.com/a/sunlightfoundation.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Ao... ). In addition to name and URL, the list includes focus areas and social media links and much more.

So far they have a list of over 500 opengov groups across the globe. If you don't see your transparency organization in the list, submit information about it to Sunlight Foundation here: http://snlg.ht/19tUoCS

Categories: All , Technical
10:44
Microsoft announces in-memory-enhanced Microsoft SQL Server 2014, supports hybrid cloud with Windows Server and System Center upgrades.

Categories: Influential
10:44
Microsoft announces in-memory-enhanced Microsoft SQL Server 2014, supports hybrid cloud with Windows Server and System Center upgrades.

Categories: Influential
10:42
A data center construction project must have a schedule and that schedule must allow for the fact that during a six-month construction period, you’re probably going to run into some less than optimal weather. Chris Curtis of Compass Datacenters writes about running into much more than sub-optimal...
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10:35
During May, the most popular story on Data Center Knowledge was about Sears efforts to retrofit its shuttered retail outlets into data centers. Here's a look at our top trending stories for May 2013.
Categories: All , Technical
10:34

East Room

10:00 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you so much.  Welcome to the White House.  And thank you, Janelle, for that introduction and sharing your story, and making such a difference through your organization.  We’re really proud to have you here.

I want to thank Secretary Sebelius, Secretary Arne Duncan, Secretary Ric Shinseki for their leadership and helping to organize this event.  And I also want to acknowledge some outstanding members of Congress who are here and who care deeply about this issue. 

And finally, I want to thank all of you for participating in this national conference on mental health.  We wanted to bring together folks who’ve suffered from mental illness and families who’ve supported them.  We wanted to bring together advocates and educators, faith leaders, veterans, local officials. 

All of you have shown an extraordinary commitment to what is a critical goal, and that is to make sure that people aren’t suffering in silence and that we have the capacity to pull together all the resources and support and love that’s out there to go after an extraordinary challenge in our society.

The main goal of this conference is not to start a conversation -- so many of you have spent decades waging long and lonely battles to be heard.  Instead, it’s about elevating that conversation to a national level and bringing mental illness out of the shadows. 

We want to let people living with mental health challenges know that they are not alone, and we’ve got to be making sure that we’re committed to support those fellow Americans, because struggling with a mental illness or caring for someone who does can be isolating.  And I think everybody here who’s experienced the issue in one way or another understands that.  It begins to feel as if not only are you alone, but that you shouldn’t burden others with the challenge and the darkness, day in, day out -- what some call a cloud that you just can't seem to escape -- begins to close in.

The truth is, in any given year, one in five adults experience a mental illness -- one in five.  Forty-five million Americans suffer from things like depression or anxiety, schizophrenia or PTSD.  Young people are affected at a similar rate.  So we all know somebody -- a family member, a friend, a neighbor -- who has struggled or will struggle with mental health issues at some point in their lives.  Michelle and I have both known people who have battled severe depression over the years, people we love.  And oftentimes, those who seek treatment go on to lead happy, healthy, productive lives.

So we know that recovery is possible, we know help is available, and yet, as a society, we often think about mental health differently than other forms of health.  You see commercials on TV about a whole array of physical health issues, some of them very personal.  (Laughter.)  And yet, we whisper about mental health issues and avoid asking too many questions. 

The brain is a body part too; we just know less about it.  And there should be no shame in discussing or seeking help for treatable illnesses that affect too many people that we love.  We've got to get rid of that embarrassment; we've got to get rid of that stigma.  Too many Americans who struggle with mental health illnesses are still suffering in silence rather than seeking help, and we need to see it that men and women who would never hesitate to go see a doctor if they had a broken arm or came down with the flu, that they have that same attitude when it comes to their mental health. 

We see it in veterans who come home from the battlefield with the invisible wounds of war, but who feel somehow that seeking treatment is a sign of weakness when in fact it's a sign of strength.  We see it in parents who would do anything for their kids, but who often fight their mental health battle alone -– afraid that reaching out would somehow reflect badly on them. 

We see it in the tragedies that we have the power to prevent.  And I want to be absolutely clear:  The overwhelming majority of people who suffer from mental illnesses are not violent.  They will never pose a threat to themselves or others.  And there are a whole lot of violent people with no diagnosable mental health issues.  But we also know that most suicides each year involve someone with a mental health or substance abuse disorder.  And in some cases, when a condition goes untreated, it can lead to tragedy on a larger scale. 

We can do something about stories like these.  In many cases, treatment is available and effective.  We can help people who suffer from a mental illness continue to be great colleagues, great friends, the people we love.  We can take out some pain and give them a new sense of hope.  But it requires all of us to act.  And there are a few ways we can do our part.

First, we’ve got to do a better job recognizing mental health issues in our children, and making it easier for Americans of all ages to seek help.  Today, less than 40 percent of people with mental illness receive treatment -- less than 40 percent.  Even though three-quarters of mental illnesses emerge by the end of -- by the age of 24, only about half of children with mental health problems receive treatment.  Now think about it:  We wouldn’t accept it if only 40 percent of Americans with cancers got treatment.  We wouldn’t accept it if only half of young people with diabetes got help.  Why should we accept it when it comes to mental health?  It doesn't make any sense.

The good news is, there are plenty of groups that are stepping up to change that.  So a former colleague of mine, Gordon Smith, a former Republican Senator, lost his son to suicide 10 years ago.  And I remember him speaking so eloquently about it.  Gordon is now the head of the National Association of Broadcasters, and today, the National Association of Broadcasters is announcing a new campaign designed to change attitudes about mental illness through TV ads and social media,   because Gordon doesn’t want other parents to go through the agonizing loss that he’s endured.  So we thank you, Gordon, for that great work.  (Applause.)

You’ve got secondary school principals who are holding assemblies on mental health.  You’ve got organizations like the YMCA who are volunteering to train staff to recognize the signs of depression and other mental illnesses in our young people.  You got leaders from different faith communities who are getting their congregations involved.  And dozens of other organizations have today made similar commitments, so we’ve very thankful to all of you.

There are other people who are leading by example.  My great friend, Patrick Kennedy, when he was running for reelection back in 2006, he could have avoided talking about his struggles with bipolar disorder and addiction.  Let’s face it, he’s a Kennedy.  (Laughter.)   He was -- his seat was pretty safe.  Everybody loved him.  And yet, Patrick used his experience as a way to connect and to lift up these issues, not hide from them. 

And one day, a woman came up to Patrick at a senior center and told him she was afraid to tell her friends she was taking medication for a mental illness because she was worried they might treat her differently.  She told Patrick, “You’re the only one who knows aside from my son.”  And so Patrick started realizing how much power there could be for people to speak out on these issues.  And Patrick carried these stories back with him to Washington, where he worked with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, including his dad, to make sure the mental health services you get through your insurance plan at work are covered the same way that physical health services are -- a huge victory.  (Applause.) 

So because of Patrick's efforts and the colleagues who worked with him, it's easier for millions of people to join him on the road to recovery, which brings me to a second point.  It’s not enough to help more Americans seek treatment -– we also have to make sure that the treatment is there when they're ready to seek it. 

For years now, our mental health system has struggled to serve people who depend on it.  That’s why, under the Affordable Care Act, we’re expanding mental health and substance abuse benefits for more than 60 million Americans.  (Applause.)  New health insurance plans are required to cover things like depression screenings for adults and behavioral assessments for children.  And beginning next year, insurance companies will no longer be able to deny anybody coverage because of a pre-existing mental health condition.  (Applause.) 

We’re also investing in science and basic research to make it easier to diagnose and treat disease early.  And earlier this year, I announced an ambitious initiative to develop tools for mapping the human brain, which could help scientists and researchers unlock the answers to conditions that affect mental health.

We’re also doing more to support our troops and our veterans who are suffering from things like traumatic brain disorder -- or traumatic brain injury or PTSD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Today, we lose 22 veterans a day to suicide -- 22.  We've got to do a better job than that of preventing these all too often silent tragedies.  That’s why we’ve poured an enormous amount of resources into high-quality care and better treatment for our troops. 

And today, under Ric Shinseki's leadership, the VA is going even further.  They’re partnering with 24 communities in nine states to help reduce wait times for veterans seeking mental health care.  And they're -- they’ve met their goal of hiring 1,600 new mental health providers, which means this summer they're going to hold more than 150 summits like this one in communities all across the country so that every one of our servicemembers and veterans understand -- just like you take care of yourself and each other on the battlefield, you’ve got to do the same thing off the battlefield.  That’s part of being strong.

For many people who suffer from a mental illness, recovery can be challenging.  But what helps more than anything, what gives so many of our friends and loved ones strength, is the knowledge that you are not alone.  You’re not alone.  You’re surrounded by people who care about you and who will support you on the journey to get well.  We're here for you.

And that’s what this conference is about.  That’s why these issues are so important.  So if there's anybody out there who's listening, if you’re struggling, seek help. 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Thank you, Mr. President. 

THE PRESIDENT:  You're welcome.  (Applause.)  If you know somebody who is struggling, help them reach out.  Remember the family members who shoulder their own burdens and need our support as well.  And more than anything, let people who are suffering in silence know that recovery is possible.  They’re not alone.  There's hope.  There's possibility.  And that’s what all of you represent with the extraordinary advocacy and work that you've already done.

So thank you all for being here.  Let’s do everything we can to help our fellow Americans heal and thrive.  And now I’d like to turn it over to Secretary Sebelius who will be leading our opening panel. 

Thank you very much, everybody.  (Applause.) 

END
10:15 A.M. EDT

Categories: All , Technical
10:31

When people at your company talk about wanting to create great digital customer experiences (DX), do they quickly venture into the land of the abstract by talking about technology platforms and features?

If so, you're not alone. I see this every day in my research of web content management and related software that supports digital experience strategies. It's easy for technology, marketing and business people to embrace the concept of creating delightful multichannel digital experiences. But far too many organizations still find it difficult to actually create DX that matters to customers and helps their brand gain a competitive edge.

Fortunately, inspiration isn't far away. We've reached an inflection point in the evolution of digital experience where companies and brands are now selling the digital experience as much as they focus on what they're actually selling.

Suddenly, technology-enabled experiences have morphed into the product. This should be a wake-up call for application development and delivery (AD&D) professionals everywhere to grasp this challenge. The same goes for digital experience agencies and partners that service brands. When digital experiences become the product, technologists have the opportunity to help bridge the DX vision and DX technology planning and project execution inside organizations. Tech capabilities and features matter most when you interpret them for the business and show people what's possible.

Recent TV commercials here in the US from Geico, AutoTrader and La-Z-Boy each shine the spotlight not so much on their products (auto insurance, cars and furniture, respectively) but on sweet digital experiences that focus on the needs of their customers. Specifically:

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Categories: Influential
10:24
The retirement plan will be made whole, Secretary Lew says.
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10:22
International stocks fall, while other offerings grow modestly.
Categories: Influential
10:15
A considerable number of applications will be relying more on SSDs.
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10:10
From Facebook to security guards, private alternatives to government are on the rise.
Categories: Influential
10:06
Independent body complains ATF and state agencies denied its staff access.
Categories: Influential
10:04
Debuting at Computex this week, ultrabooks with instant-on capability and all-day battery life will be more competitive with smartphones and tablets.

Categories: Influential
10:00

Last March the Office of Management and Budget unveiled PortfolioStat. The goal was simple, help agencies save time, money and resources by giving them a tool to asses their portfolio management process. …

Categories: All , Technical
10:00

Michelle and I were deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Senator Frank Lautenberg, a proud New Jerseyan who lived America’s promise as a citizen, and fought to keep that promise alive as a senator. 

The son of working-class immigrants, Frank joined the Army during World War II, went to college on the GI Bill, and co-founded one of America’s most successful companies. First elected to the Senate in 1982, he improved the lives of countless Americans with his commitment to our nation’s health and safety, from improving our public transportation to protecting citizens from gun violence to ensuring that members of our military and their families get the care they deserve.  Michelle and I extend our deepest condolences to Bonnie, the Lautenberg family, and the people of New Jersey, whom Frank served so well.

Categories: All , Technical
10:00
Software industry trade group urges policymakers to resist rules and regulations that curb data collection and analysis.

Categories: Influential
10:00

Last March the Office of Management and Budget unveiled PortfolioStat. The goal was simple, help agencies save time, money and resources by giving them a tool to asses their portfolio management process. …

Categories: All , Technical
10:00
Software industry trade group urges policymakers to resist rules and regulations that curb data collection and analysis.

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9:45
Not long ago this joke was buzzing around the Internet: Question:  Why was the computer late to work? Answer: Because [...]
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9:45
Among all advanced nations, we rank 28th -- barely better than Mexico.
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9:26
By Ryan Kamauff Here are the top mobile news and stories of the day. Your iPhone Can Be Hacked With a Modified Charger – This scary news from the Georgia Institute of Technology is that a team of researchers have created a prototype iPhone charger which can inject malware onto devices. It apparently works on all current-generation iOS [...]

Find more at CTOvision.com
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9:17
Agency wins additional flexibility after deadly tornadoes.
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9:10
Who will ultimately be responsible for data management?
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9:08
This 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for grades 6-8 educators on to be held on June 4, at 6:30 p.m. EDT will address Next Generation Science Standards as they relate to the NES lesson, Engineering a Stable Rocket.
Categories: Influential
9:07
Apple has to pay out $6.5 million in home copying levies that it collected but failed to deliver to the appropriate agency, the Paris High Court ruled.
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